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lume wellness

case study, project

PRODUCT / USER EXPERIENCE & INTERFACE

2014 – 2016

 

Lume collects and visualizes information about your mental and physical health. Though there exist a number of solutions which perform this function, few go the extra step to offer actionable or deep insights into the numbers they report. Furthermore, many of the tools used to record data regarding mental health - in particular emotional data - lag significantly behind those designed to capture physical information.

Information Architecture

Information Architecture

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Daily Overview

Daily Overview

The daily overview presented a concise summary of the day's data. One of the problems we faced early on was building an interface to display only one health aspect, knowing that we would eventually need to accommodate the addition of other health aspects in future updates.

 As the app evolved to include data from a variety of sources, the Daily Overview and the Timeline were merged into one view. The result was a dashboard that provided a data summary for each health aspect, a snapshot of your wellness for the current day, week, or month. The goal here was to balance density of data with readability.  The dashboard needed to provide users immediate access to their information, since it's the first thing they see after the app loads. When tapped, each card leads to detailed reports for each health aspect, including a timeline of activity for each major area of health. In addition, with a single touch, more data can be recorded and visualized.

As the app evolved to include data from a variety of sources, the Daily Overview and the Timeline were merged into one view. The result was a dashboard that provided a data summary for each health aspect, a snapshot of your wellness for the current day, week, or month. The goal here was to balance density of data with readability.

The dashboard needed to provide users immediate access to their information, since it's the first thing they see after the app loads. When tapped, each card leads to detailed reports for each health aspect, including a timeline of activity for each major area of health. In addition, with a single touch, more data can be recorded and visualized.

Weekly Goals

Weekly Goals

Set weekly meditation and activity goals. Answer a few simple questions and we help define your baseline level of activity. Using this baseline, the app suggests a target that is attainable, but also pushes you just outside of your comfort zone.

Designing Emotion Tracking

Designing Emotion Tracking

How do you quantify something so subjective as emotion? Many of our competitors lacked a compelling or satisfactory solution. Our goal was to create a system that was simple and flexible, yet yielded data that could be visualized in a graph.

First, we separated emotion into two parts, describing it as  valence (from good to bad) and arousal (high intensity to low intensity). In terms that would make more sense to our users, we described them as mood and energy. Next, we used a PANAS scale to assign a number to each level of valence and arousal, 1 being the lowest and 7 being the highest.

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 We came up with a variety of solutions, some working better than others.

We came up with a variety of solutions, some working better than others.

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 In the final iteration of the design, tracking emotion became a simple, two–step process. First, swipe around the circle to enter a mood value. Confirm, then swipe again to enter your energy. Finally, add an optional text journal entry, and give the numbers context.  As the app evolved we continued to refine the visual design interface, while largely keeping the initial flow unchanged. According to our users, we had found a paradigm that worked for them.

In the final iteration of the design, tracking emotion became a simple, two–step process. First, swipe around the circle to enter a mood value. Confirm, then swipe again to enter your energy. Finally, add an optional text journal entry, and give the numbers context.

As the app evolved we continued to refine the visual design interface, while largely keeping the initial flow unchanged. According to our users, we had found a paradigm that worked for them.

Day Detail

Day Detail

Each health aspect is represented by a different color and icon. Since the colors would be seen together frequently, it was important to select a harmonious palette. Bright, saturated secondary hues were used strategically, inviting the user to touch and explore their personal data.

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Team

Team

Robert Gross

Alexander Lyons

Todd Bennings

Ben Robinson

Elizabeth Allen

Stephen Skura

Shout out to Jonathan Robins, Byung Kang, and Milord.